Blogging the Bookshelf

Blogging my bookshelf – one book at a time

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Entries Tagged as 'military'

German Terrorism in WW1 – “The Guns of August 1914” – Barbara Tuchman

April 3rd, 2012 · Comments Off on German Terrorism in WW1 – “The Guns of August 1914” – Barbara Tuchman · Human Rights, War, WW1

The turn of events in Belgium was a product of the German theory of terror. Clausewitz had prescribed terror as the proper method to shorten war, his whole theory of war being based on the necessity of making it short, sharp and decisive. He said the civil population must not be exempted from war’s effects […]

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Vodka and the Russian Army and Economy – “The Guns of August 1914”, Barbara Tuchman

April 2nd, 2012 · Comments Off on Vodka and the Russian Army and Economy – “The Guns of August 1914”, Barbara Tuchman · Communism, Economics, History, Policy, Politics, WW1

Vodka, another traditional companion of war, was prohibited (by the Russians). In the last mobilization in 1904 when soldiers came reeling in and regimental depots were a mess of drunken slumbers and broken bottles, it had taken an extra week to straighten out the confusion. Now, with the French calling every day’s delay a matter […]

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Some Damned Foolish Thing in the Balkans – “The Guns of August 1914”, Barbara Tuchman

April 1st, 2012 · Comments Off on Some Damned Foolish Thing in the Balkans – “The Guns of August 1914”, Barbara Tuchman · History, Leadership, Politics, War, WW1

“Some damned foolish thing in the Balkans,” Bismark had predicted would ignite the next war. The assassination of the Austrian heir apparent, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, by Serbian nationalists on June 28, 1914, satisfied his condition… War pressed against every frontier. Suddenly dismayed, governments struggled and twisted to fend it off. It was no use. Agents […]

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Glory – “The Guns of August 1914”, Barbara Tuchman 

March 31st, 2012 · Comments Off on Glory – “The Guns of August 1914”, Barbara Tuchman  · War, WW1

“If we are to be crushed,” Bassompierre recorded their sentiment, “let us be crushed gloriously.” In 1914 “glory” was a word spoken without embarrassment, and honor a familiar concept that people believed in.

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Regulations Are All Very Well for the Drill – “The Guns of August 1914”, Barbara Tuchman

March 31st, 2012 · Comments Off on Regulations Are All Very Well for the Drill – “The Guns of August 1914”, Barbara Tuchman · Leadership

Though a profound student of Clausewitz, Foch did not, like Clausewitz’s German successors, believe in a foolproof schedule of battle worked out in advance. Rather he taught the necessity of perpetual adaptability and improvisation to fit circumstances. “Regulations,” he would say, “are all very well for drill but in the hour of danger they are […]

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March 30th, 2012 · Comments Off on · quote

Though a profound student of Clausewitz, Foch did not, like Clausewitz’s German successors, believe in a foolproof schedule of battle worked out in advance. Rather he taught the necessity of perpetual adaptability and improvisation to fit circumstances. “Regulations,” he would say, “are all very well for drill but in the hour of danger they are […]

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Don’t Forget me Cobber – “Fromelles” – Patrick Lindsay

January 16th, 2012 · Comments Off on Don’t Forget me Cobber – “Fromelles” – Patrick Lindsay · Anzac, Australian, Australiana, History, War, WW1

Bean highlights the work of one of the rescuers, 40 year old Victorian farmer, Sergeant Simon Fraser of the 57th Battalion, and quotes from a letter Fraser later wrote him: “It was no light work getting in with a heavy weight on you back, especially if he had a broken leg or arm and no […]

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Groaning Wounded – “Fromelles” – Patrick Lindsay

January 16th, 2012 · Comments Off on Groaning Wounded – “Fromelles” – Patrick Lindsay · Anzac, Australian, Australiana, History, Humanism, Philosophy, War, WW1

The reality was that, from midnight on the day of the battle, the flow of casualties had swamped the capacity of the medical staff and the stretcher-bearers and the front-line trenches were chock full of the wounded and dying… While the front lines were a confusion of wounded and dying, many more still lay exposed […]

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5533 Casualties – “Fromelles” – Patrick Lindsay

January 15th, 2012 · Comments Off on 5533 Casualties – “Fromelles” – Patrick Lindsay · Anzac, Australian, Australiana, History, War, WW1

On the afternoon of 20 July, the battalions which had attacked the previous evening gathered near their divisional headquarters and their losses were chillingly clear. Each of the three Australian brigades lost more than 1700 men, either killed, wounded, missing or captured. In one terrifying night the Australians suffered a total of 5533 casualties – […]

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No Man’s Land – “Fromelles” – Patrick Lindsay

January 15th, 2012 · 1 Comment · Anzac, Australian, Australiana, History, War, WW1

In one remarkable attempt to reach safety, a group of eleven men of the 8th Brigade, under the leadership of Captain Frank Krinks, decided to make a run for it as a group, vowing to stay and help any of their number who found trouble. Having decided to leave their weapons and rely on a […]

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